EFFICIENCY FINDER
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SHIP AGE FIT in years
0-33-66-99-1212+
PAYBACK TIME within years
0-11-22-33-44-5
INVESTMENT SCOPE in US dollars
XS0-10k S10-150k M150-750k L750k-3M XL>3M
EASE OF EXECUTION
anytimemaintenancedry dock
VESSEL SPECIFICS (optional)
Measures apply differently to different vessel types. By selecting a vessel, you gain a more specific view.
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CV

CV-Feeder

Bulker

Tanker

MPV

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Sorted by applicability
TRIM & BALLAST OPTIMISATION
Fuel-efficient trim and ballasting keep operational expenses low and consequently improve a vessel's operational attractiveness. Savings of up to 4-6% in fuel consumption are possible.
Fuel consumption is directly impacted by vessel trim and draught. Consequently, operational costs can be kept low by applying the most fuel-efficient trim and draught for each voyage. The difficulty lies in identifying exactly which values these are. With the installation and utilisation of currently available trim assistant software tools, fuel savings of up to 4-6% can be achieved.
Background
  • Trim assistant software tools take advantage of databases containing ship-specific resistance and power demand data
  • Optimum trim is calculated based on the input of operational parameters such as speed, draught, water depth and ballast condition
Important considerations
  • The basis for attaining fuel savings is a reliable trim performance prediction, obtained, for instance, through the simulation of hundreds of operational conditions for the full-scale, propelled vessel
  • When the calculated trim data is appropriately viewed onboard, crews have a decision-making tool for choosing to change ballast water amounts based on its benefits or disadvantages
  • Integrated into the cargo planning process, optimum trim information can be used to plan cargo stowage for optimising fuel consumption
  • Easy onboard implementation of the tool and the monitoring of its impact supports the measure in being successful
Applicability with Ship Type
CV
CV-Feeder
Bulker
Tanker
MPV
Values across all Ship Types:
Ship Age Fit0-12+ years
Investment Scope0-1 years
Payback TimeS (10-150k USD)
Ease of Executionanytime
Pre-Planning Time0-3 months
ANCHORING EFFICIENCY
Organisational anchoring of energy management is the basis for successful implementation of efficiency measures. Assigning responsibilities, creating awareness and building skills are key to fostering behavioural changes towards energy-efficient operations.
Operational efficiency measures require, above all, changes in behaviour. Simply by changing established procedures, significant energy savings can be achieved without making major investments. Survey results show that lack of knowledge transfer and resistance to change are the biggest hurdles to improving the efficiency of operations. Too little has been done thus far to educate and motivate staff.
Background
  • Assignment of clear responsibilities that consider the associated workload
  • Education of staff onboard and ashore in a meaningful and target-group-centred manner via communication, trainings, monitoring and other interactive means
  • Motivation of staff to participate - through acknowledgement, competition and incentive schemes
Important considerations
  • Managing the change process requires skilled human resources
  • Changing behaviour and making staff comfortable with new procedures requires clear and simple instructions using the best suitable channel to convey the message
  • Implementation plans should consider the time and resources needed to implement the change
  • Acceptance of new processes increases when there is a benefit for the person applying them
  • Only transparent and fair incentive schemes result in the necessary motivation
Applicability with Ship Type
CV
CV-Feeder
Bulker
Tanker
MPV
Values across all Ship Types:
Ship Age Fit0-12+ years
Investment ScopeXS-S (0-150k USD)
Payback Time0-1 years
Ease of Executionanytime
Pre-Planning Time0-3 months
ENERGY AWARENESS TRAINING
Regular training of crew and onshore staff raises awareness of the role that each individual plays in the company and is essential in the quest to successfully save energy and implement operational measures.
Energy saving in day-to-day operations decisively depends on the skill and commitment of crews and onshore staff. A wellplanned training programme supports personnel in obtaining and maintaining the required competencies for effective fuel saving. Typically it also improves communication between ship and shore relating to the vessel's performance. For effective training, both the target group and the objective of the training need to be clear from the very start.
Background
  • Energy saving awareness covers a broad range of aspects and involves several occupational levels. Typical operational training includes measures that make a wider impact - such as voyage planning, speed setting, weather routing, trim and ballast optimisation, cargo planning and cargo heating - as well as smaller-scale yet effective measures such as electricity consumption reduction or rudder and autopilot settings.
Important considerations
  • Involving the participants, getting their interest and facilitating fruitful discussions are the key to a successful trainings
  • Training should be conducted both onshore and onboard to suitably address the different people involved such as groups, like engineers, as well as cross-professional (e.g. nautical and technical officers) or cross-hierarchical groups
  • Different types of training should be selected in line with daily routines and work processes, encompassing individual trainings, office/onboard briefings, classroom courses, self-study or e-learning
  • Supporting advisory can be helpful in determining suitable content and teaching methods
Applicability with Ship Type
CV
CV-Feeder
Bulker
Tanker
MPV
Values across all Ship Types:
Ship Age Fit0-12+ years
Investment ScopeXS-S (0-150k USD)
Payback Time0-1 years
Ease of Executionanytime
Pre-Planning Time0-8 months
WEATHER ROUTING
Optimising a vessel's route based on environmental information such as wind and current patterns can lower fuel consumption and decrease delays while also reducing structural and cargo damage claims.
Modern weather routing software products utilise weather, wave and current information as well as hydrodynamic details of the vessel to provide the ship's crew with real-time ship-specific routing advice. A recent study indicated the following cost reducing results from a liner operator's perspective:
  • The actual number of hours the vessel was delayed due to heavy weather decreased by 80%
  • The number of structural damage claims due to heavy weather decreased by 73%, while the cost of claims declined by 29%
  • Cargo damage claims due to heavy weather decreased by 87%
Background
Weather routing software tools compare available environmental information (weather, current, wave, ice, tide) with vessel and voyage data in order to provide:
  • Optimised routing advice
  • Optimised speed along the route
  • Avoidance of bad weather
  • Monitoring of chartered vessels for speed claims
  • Reduced risk of damage to cargo, vessel and persons
  • Reduced propulsion power demand
Important considerations
Generally speaking, there are two types of weather routing systems:
  • Simple weather routing - pure weather forecasts are converted to routing recommendations, neglecting vessel details.
  • Decision-supporting systems - in addition to weather and waves, the vessel's behaviour in poor weather situations is also taken into account. Vessel behaviour is computed with hydrodynamic methods onboard, considering the actual loading condition and the individual ship characteristics in waves. The use of hydrodynamic sea-keeping analysis in combination with weather forecasts provides a higher degree of accuracy, allowing for routes that might otherwise be considered unsafe. Since weather forecasts are used for strategic route planning, decision-supporting systems with wave measurement devices (i.e. wave radars) are beneficial when it comes to tactical manoeuvres in heavy-weather navigation.
Applicability with Ship Type
CV
CV-Feeder
Bulker
Tanker
MPV
Values across all Ship Types:
Ship Age Fit0-12+ years
Investment ScopeXS-S (0-150k USD)
Payback Time0-4 years
Ease of Executionanytime
Pre-Planning Time0-3 months
SPEED OPTIMISATION
Conscious speed remains a major aspect of voyage execution optimisation. Double-digit savings potential can be harvested by a speed setting that takes into account key conditions of the individual application.
Although voyage earnings are fragmented, they are highly dependent on vessel speed, fuel price and freight rates. Simply by adjusting speed, ship owners and operators can potentially increase their operating profits. Despite today's broad awareness of the importance of speed optimisation, software-based tools can still yield significant benefits and help owners and operators to save fuel on a double-digit percentage level.
Background
  • Integrated in a broader voyage optimisation software suite or as a stand-alone solution, speed optimisation tools identify the optimal operational speed for a vessel and/or entire fleet based on operational specifications and dynamic market conditions
Important considerations
  • A prerequisite for effective speed optimisation is reliable consumption data for the different operating modes, e.g. for laden and ballast conditions
  • The identification of key parameters affecting the result is important for effective decision-making; thus, sensitivity analysis of parameters affecting voyage earnings should be considered
  • Speed optimisation should be included in the procedures for voyage planning and execution, and communicated clearly to the charterer
Applicability with Ship Type
CV
CV-Feeder
Bulker
Tanker
MPV
Values across all Ship Types:
Ship Age Fit0-12+ years
Investment ScopeS (10-150k USD)
Payback Time0-1 years
Ease of Executionanytime
Pre-Planning Time0-3 months
PERFORMANCE MANAGEMENT
Mature performance management solutions help to save fuel, cut emissions and lower operational costs by making fleet performance visible and easy to understand, as well as by leading to the right actions for improvement.
Fleet performance management solutions utilise operational data to continuously analyse and optimise ship performance. Objectives include the reduction of fuel and machinery-related expenses, as well as the transparency, compliancy and demonstration of efficient and green operations. Supporting tools can significantly reduce staff workload and speed up performance improvements.
Background
  • Regulatory, market and cost pressures call for an increased focus on performance - while the cost for skilled human resources is considerable
  • Lack of comprehensive data collection, synthesis and ongoing evaluation limits the crew's ability to identify costly deficiencies and prohibits common awareness and continuous improvement
Important considerations
  • Comprehensive performance coverage and meaningful KPIs ease and speed up identification of key deficiencies and help to remedy actions
  • Data collection should be tailored to performance evaluation and keep related costs and crew effort on a reasonable level
  • Access to individualised ship performance models significantly increases benefits by removing "data scatter"
  • Provision of clear and flexible dashboards facilitates decisionmaking as well as internal and external communication
  • Added agility and reassurance can be created through direct access to expert support when needed
Applicability with Ship Type
CV
CV-Feeder
Bulker
Tanker
MPV
Values across all Ship Types:
Ship Age Fit0-12+ years
Investment ScopeS (10-150k USD)
Payback Time0-1 years
Ease of Executionanytime
Pre-Planning Time0-3 months
HULL & PROPELLER SMOOTHNESS
Smoothening of anti-fouling coatings or regular hull and propeller cleaning can reduce water resistance for approximately 2-5% in fuel savings.
Depending on ecological, operational and other conditions, marine growth on both hull and propeller can result in added resistance of over 1% a months. By specifying a matched hull coating system or, alternatively, by regularly cleaning the hull and propeller, significant fuel savings can be realised.
Background
  • Current biocidal anti-fouling systems and ultra-smooth silicone non-stick systems are available
  • Alternatively, hull and propeller cleaning is an option but depends on available resources and port regulations, and it reduces the life-span of most coatings
  • The release of biocidal products into seawater requires regulatory consideration and affects the choice of coating system
  • Several copper- and silicone-based coatings exist which maintain and lower hull resistance; however, the more expensive siliconebased coatings achieve the same results above a minimum speed and do not need replacing unless damaged
Important considerations
  • Application of the correct coating system highly depends on the operating profile of the vessel (i.e. operating area, speed, anchoring and birthing times)
  • Application of a new coating system is best completed with class renewal to minimise dry docking
  • Freshly applied anti-fouling is not the only contributor to optimising hull resistance: the underlying hull roughness measurement should also be monitored
Applicability with Ship Type
CV
CV-Feeder
Bulker
Tanker
MPV
Values across all Ship Types:
Ship Age Fit0-12+ years
Investment ScopeXS-M (0-750k USD)
Payback Time0-2 years
Ease of Executionmaintenance, dry dock
Pre-Planning Time0-3 months
ENERGY SAVING DEVICES
Mounting or exchanging appendages such as pre-swirl or ducts may count for up to 5% in fuel savings, whereas propeller boss cap fins and rudder bulbs, such as Costa bulbs, may each count for up to 2% in fuel savings.
Depending on ship type and operational field, diverse energy saving devices can be mounted to improve water velocity distribution to the propeller and to minimise wake losses due to swirl in the out-flow of the propeller.
Background
  • Possible measures include pre-swirl stator, post-swirl fins, ducts, propeller boss cap fins, Grim vane wheel, Costa bulb, etc
  • Pre-swirl devices aim to improve the propeller inflow conditions
  • Ducts may improve propulsion efficiency, e.g. by improving the propeller inflow
  • Post-swirl devices are used to recover parts of the rotational energy in the propeller slip stream
Important considerations
  • Device evaluation - identify those devices with the potential to improve efficiency based on the operational profile of the vessel
  • Design upgrade - expert investigation, including computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis of an energy saving device's potential, is recommended to evaluate its interactions with the hull and other components, and to establish design details (patents are to be considered)
  • Tests - towing tank tests to evaluate the device's savings
  • Detailed engineering - details are established for workshop drawings and change implementation
  • Assessment of the structural design
  • Implementation - the chosen device(s) is added to the vessel
Applicability with Ship Type
CV
CV-Feeder
Bulker
Tanker
MPV
Values across all Ship Types:
Ship Age Fit0-12+ years
Investment ScopeM-L (150k-3M USD)
Payback Time2-4 years
Ease of Executiondry dock
Pre-Planning Time3-8 months
BULBOUS BOW MODIFICATION
Exchanging the bulbous bow with an improved design can result in reduced water resistance - for approximately 3-6% in fuel savings.
Current operating profiles (speed-draught matrix) for many vessels deviate significantly from the profile or design point that determined the initial design of the vessel. Accordingly, the vessel's hull profile is not optimised for current operations. For existing vessels, where the degrees of freedom in hull form optimisation are limited compared to a newbuilding project, retrofitting of the bulbous bow can bring considerable fuel savings.
Background
  • Replacing the bulbous bow with one that is optimised for the new operating profile can result in fuel savings of between 3 and 6%
Important considerations
  • Options evaluation - expert evaluation to determine whether a retrofit has the potential to improve efficiency based on the changed operational profile of the vessel
  • Design upgrade - computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis of numerous bulb designs to optimise the bow form for the new operational target profile
  • Tests - towing tank tests provide a common format for evaluating a new bow form's savings
  • Detailed engineering - details are established for workshop drawings and change implementation
  • Implementation - the chosen design is added to the vessel
Applicability with Ship Type
CV
CV-Feeder
Bulker
Tanker
MPV
Values across all Ship Types:
Ship Age Fit0-9 years
Investment ScopeM (150-750k USD)
Payback Time1-3 years
Ease of Executiondry dock
Pre-Planning Time3-12 months
PROPELLER EXCHANGE
Upgrading to a high-efficiency propeller can bring approximately 2-3% in fuel savings.
Changed operational profiles with varying speeds often lead to non-optimal propeller designs on existing vessels. These propellers have typically been designed for maximum speed and low cavitation. An upgrade to a high-efficiency propeller can bring fuel savings of between 2 and 3%.
Background
  • The exchange of the propeller with an upgraded design assures operation at peak efficiency
Important considerations
  • To unveil the full potential of a propeller upgrade, an engineering analysis should be conducted utilising computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis
  • This measure typically makes the most sense when combined with additional improvements on machinery
  • The material value of the old propeller can pay a significant share of costs towards a new propeller
  • This measure is suitable for all segments with slow steaming, especially container and large vessel series
Applicability with Ship Type
CV
CV-Feeder
Bulker
Tanker
MPV
Values across all Ship Types:
Ship Age Fit0-12 years
Investment ScopeM (150-750k USD)
Payback Time1-3 years
Ease of Executiondry dock
Pre-Planning Time8-12 months
AUXILIARY SYSTEMS OPTIMISATION
Optimising auxiliary systems to real operational profiles leads to significantly reduced energy consumption.
Auxiliary engines and systems are often designed for extreme ambient conditions or 100% engine load, which rarely occur. The auxiliary systems offer potential for energy consumption reduction
Background
  • Measures include speed control of pumps and fans, control strategies of cooling water systems, room ventilation, redesign of piping and instruments, advanced computation of air/gas temperature distribution with reduced storage ventilation and with optimised ventilation systems
Implementation
  • It is important to consider whether the vessel is equipped for pump management
  • As a starting point, a simulation model of machinery systems as installed, and variants with optimised machinery arrangements and control, can be set up to compare alternatives with varying ambient conditions and operational profiles
  • Then, concepts for new designs of auxiliary machinery can be evaluated with regard to efficiency and costs
  • As a result, an optimised machinery design and instructions for the crew lead to reduced fuel consumption
Applicability with Ship Type
CV
CV-Feeder
Bulker
Tanker
MPV
Values across all Ship Types:
Ship Age Fit0-12 years
Investment ScopeS (10-150k USD)
Payback Time1-2 years
Ease of Executionanytime, maintenance
Pre-Planning Time0-3 months
ENGINE MODIFICATION FOR SLOW STEAMING
Modifying the main engine for slow steaming, for example with turbocharger cut-out and fuel injection modifications for improved combustion, reduces maintenance and decreases fuel consumption.
Engine operation at low loads causes turbochargers to operate below their optimal range, limiting the potential fuel oil savings. Additionally, it causes traditional fuel valves to produce carbon deposits in the gas ways, leading to higher maintenance costs. Modifying the engine for speeds as low as 50% of the design speed can prevent mid-term damage and increase combustion efficiency, producing significant fuel savings.
Background
  • Possible measures include turbocharger cut-out, installing slide fuel valves and adjusting cylinder lubrication
  • A flexible turbocharger cut-out with swing gates allows the remaining turbochargers to run at higher, more efficient RPMs and adapts for slow steaming when needed, while retaining the ability to perform efficiently when higher loads and speeds are required
  • Slide-type fuel valves are highly recommended for large-scale, slow-steaming operations, as they improve combustion processes and eliminate carbon deposits in exhaust gas ways
Important considerations
  • Electronically controlled engines have a larger potential for optimisation
  • Latest developments in turbocharger cut-outs with swing gates reveal that this measure is not only attractive to vessels with 3, 4 or more chargers, but also for vessels with 2 chargers
  • Slide-type fuel valves are standard for new engines, and thus retrofitting of older engines is recommended
  • Cylinder oil injectors are exchanged as units together with a software upgrade
  • Engine modifications should include an analysis of the impact on the NOx Technical File, considering necessary amendments
  • Cold corrosion can be avoided with modified water cooling systems or by optimised lube oils
  • These measures are suitable for all segments with slow steaming, especially container ships powered by 2-stroke engines
Applicability with Ship Type
CV
CV-Feeder
Bulker
Tanker
MPV
Values across all Ship Types:
Ship Age Fit3-12+ years
Investment ScopeM (150-750k USD)
Payback Time0-2 years
Ease of Executionmaintenance, dry dock
Pre-Planning Time0-8 months
ENGINE DE-RATING
In today's slow-steaming market, changing or modifying the main engine for permanently lower power output can increase efficiency and reduce specific fuel oil consumption (SFOC) at all loads.
The main engines of many existing vessels were designed for one specific, high vessel speed. De-rating the engine offers the possibility to change the specified maximum continuous rating to lower load points, resulting in higher efficiency with reduced specific fuel oil consumption (SFOC).
Background
  • The de-rating process changes the engine power and speed distribution rating, adapting the engine to the vessel speeds of today's slow-steaming market
  • The engine's specified maximum continuous rating is permanently lowered by limiting power output and thus the vessel's maximum speed
  • Measures include changing or modifying fuel valves, shimming between x-head and piston rod, re-matching turbochargers and consequently new technical files
  • Additional measures include deactivating cylinders and a new torsional vibration calculation
Important considerations
  • The most important step in a de-rating project is to perform a comprehensive analysis of the vessel's expected future operational profile, including the design and maximum speed after modification
  • De-rating is often implemented in conjunction with a propeller exchange. Optimising the propeller diameter for better performance at lower engine speeds can shorten the payback time of the de-rating project
  • Some de-rating measures, especially for mechanically controlled engines, may require additional de-NOx measures that have a contrary effect on the SFOC
  • This measure is suitable for all ship segments with slow steaming, especially the container segment
Applicability with Ship Type
CV
CV-Feeder
Bulker
Tanker
MPV
Values across all Ship Types:
Ship Age Fit3-12 years
Investment ScopeM-L (150k-3M USD)
Payback Time1-4 years
Ease of Executionmaintenance, dry dock
Pre-Planning Time3-8 months
LNG AS SHIP FUEL
A conversion to dual-fuel operation can result in considerable economical benefits when operations include voyages in Emission Control Areas (ECAs).
Due to upcoming emission targets in the maritime industry, alternative fuels such as LNG are in focus. LNG offers the prospect of up to a 25% reduction in CO2, a nearly complete elimination of sulphur oxides (SOX) and particle emissions, and a 90% reduction in nitrogen oxides (NOX).
Background
  • Depending on exposure to Emission Control Areas (ECAs), a payback time of less than five years is achievable for an LNG system onboard smaller vessels
  • For a 1,000 TEU vessel, for instance, a comparison of payback times for an LNG system and for a scrubber system indicates that LNG is attractive as long as it is priced lower than or equal to HFO when the fuels are compared on their energy content
Important considerations
  • A feasibility study should be conducted to determine whether a conversion to dual-fuel operation is economically feasible, which is offered as part of DNV GL's LNG Ready service approach
  • Such a project involves steps ranging from conversion of the engine to installing a complete gas storage and delivery system
  • Among the key considerations in the steering of a conversion project are the correct application of class rules for safe construction, and ensuring that equipment manufacturers correctly implement the class requirements
Applicability with Ship Type
CV
CV-Feeder
Bulker
Tanker
MPV
Values across all Ship Types:
Ship Age Fit0-12 years
Investment ScopeXL (> 3M USD)
Payback Time2-5 years
Ease of Executionmaintenance, dry dock
Pre-Planning Time8-12 months
CONTAINER CAPACITY IMPROVMENT
Some container-carrying vessels have the potential to re-arrange the cargo capacity within a given rule framework, allowing the transport of additional laden containers.
In particular a few older designs of containerships offer the possibility to increase numbers of tiers stowed on deck behind the deck house. On some vessels, the deckhouse height is sufficient to allow additional tiers to be loaded, if the visibility line has not been utilized to the maximum before.
Background
  • Investigation of the Container Stowage Arrangement plan from the SOLAS visibility requirements has led to awareness of potential for nominal capacity increases to be achieved
  • High potential exists aft of the deckhouse and at selected areas forward of the deckhouse
  • Modified weight distribution matching the new operating conditions can be achieved
  • This simple measure can be implemented quickly to unveil previously unidentified cargo capacity potential
Implementation
  • Due to the need for re-arrangement of cargo distribution, the class society should be contacted for verification
  • A new Container Stowage Plan as well as General Arrangement Plan are necessary
  • Depending upon the loading condition, an addendum to the Container Securing Manual (CSM) and/or Stability Booklet may be necessary
Applicability with Ship Type
CV
CV-Feeder
Bulker
Tanker
MPV
Values across all Ship Types:
Ship Age Fit0-12 years
Investment ScopeXS (0-10k USD)
Payback Time0-1 years
Ease of Executionanytime
Pre-Planning Time0-3 months
ROUTE SPECIFIC CONTAINER STOWAGE
Consideration of vessel- and route-specific wave loading schemes enables advanced rules for container stowage, leading to more flexibility and more laden containers onboard.
Traditionally, wave and wind loading schemes related to container stowage rules have been based on the North Atlantic route conditions. Class-defined formulas were based on the resulting maximum accelerations, limiting container stowage potential for routes in other regions. New, innovative calculation and computation methods allow the identification and exploitation of more flexible container stowage for other routes with better weather conditions. This has led to the new Route Specific Container Stowage class notation.
Background
  • By considering route-specific loading schemes, an advanced, specific acceleration profile can be generated for virtually any route
  • 18% lower accelerations, for example on the Asia–Europe route, can be used for the container stowage without compromising on safety
  • The route-specific calculations are based on long-term wave statistics of diverse clusters and are incorporated in a lashing computer
  • The new class rules for Route Specific Container Stowage (RSCS) lead to increased flexibility with stack weight increases for 20 ft. containers in the hold of up to 25%
  • A megaboxer could carry enhanced intake (i.e. heavier containers) at 4,000 TEU positions on deck, and similar improvements can be achieved for other vessel sizes as well
  • These new rules lead to improved vessel utilisation rates
Implementation
  • Contact your class society, i.e. your DNV GL office, to obtain the class notation RSCS
  • The relevant container lashing equipment supplier must be instructed as to for which route or routes a new container stowage plan and modified Container Securing Manual must be prepared
  • Lashing software for easy container stowage planning and verification is required, and is to be installed on the vessel
Applicability with Ship Type
CV
CV-Feeder
Bulker
Tanker
MPV
Values across all Ship Types:
Ship Age Fit0-12 years
Investment ScopeS (10-150k USD)
Payback Time0-1 years
Ease of Executionanytime
Pre-Planning Time0-8 months
DRAUGHT INCREASE
The draught of a vessel's structure can be increased to improve carrying capacity and deadweight
Existing vessels can be modified to enhance their carrying capacity and deadweight by increasing their draught. The result is more efficient ship operations, especially for traders utilising slow steaming with heavy containers.
Background
  • With a draught and deadweight increase, the vessel's power remainsconstant,leadingtohigherefficiencysincetheenergy consumption per deadweight tonne is reduced
  • The change of the Plimsoll mark (load line mark) is a relatively easy procedure and can be executed during maintenance
  • The change of the Plimsoll mark (load line mark) is a relatively easy procedure and can be executed during maintenance
Implementation
  • A feasibility study should be conducted to determine whether a draught increase is possible
  • The following points should be considered:
    • 1. Scantling check over the vessel length
    • 2. Re-calculation of the freeboard, including verification of all openings and doors
    • 3. Verification of the intact and damage stability as well as tonnage
Applicability with Ship Type
CV
CV-Feeder
Bulker
Tanker
MPV
Values across all Ship Types:
Ship Age Fit0-12 years
Investment ScopeXS-S (0-150k USD)
Payback Time0-1 years
Ease of Executionmaintenance
Pre-Planning Time0-3 months
DECKHOUSE HEIGHT INCREASE
Under certain circumstances, lifting the deckhouse can be an attractive option for increasing deck capacity to add additional container stowage or project cargo.
Ship operating performance can be enhanced by raising the container stowage capacity on deck.
Background
  • Lifting the deckhouse via cutting and integrating a half or full level can improve the line of sight, allowing increased con- tainer stowage in higher tiers for container ships, and project car go for MPVs
  • Due to a higher virtual centre of gravity, the capacity for 14-ton containerswilldecreaseslightly,whereasthenominalcapacity may increase by at least one tier
  • In the case of loading gear, this method is not recommended
Implementation
  • The enlarged container capacity should be investigated with respect to the intended project cargo
  • The following points should be considered:
    • Best position for the extension
    • Verification of the outfitting such as anchors, windlasses, mooring and rudder systems
    • Re-calculation of stability with respect to different container stowage
Applicability with Ship Type
CV
CV-Feeder
Bulker
Tanker
MPV
Values across all Ship Types:
Ship Age Fit3-9 years
Investment ScopeL (750k-3M USD)
Payback Time2-5 years
Ease of Executiondry dock
Pre-Planning Time8-12 months
VESSEL LENGTHENING
Lengthening of a vessel can significantly increase the carrying capacity and deadweight respectively
Some existing vessels have the potential to enhance their carrying capacity, deadweight and contracted project load by lengthening, leading to more efficient ship operations.
Background
  • Cutting the vessel structure at mid-ship to integrate a new longitudinal lengthening element is a well-proven conversion process
  • The elongation has virtually no influence on ship speed.
  • The transport cost per cargo unit is reduced, from a directcost point of view
  • The new section can be fully produced before the vessel arrives at the repair yard
Implementation
  • A feasibility study should be conducted to determine whether a lengthening is possible
  • The still water bending moment is a crucial parameter for ships in operation and should be taken into account
    • Calculation of structural strengthening, loadline, tonnage, position of collision bulkhead and intact and damage stability
    • Verification of the outfitting such as anchors, windlasses, mooring and rudder systems
    • Analysis of strength with finite element methods where deemed necessary
Applicability with Ship Type
CV
CV-Feeder
Bulker
Tanker
MPV
Values across all Ship Types:
Ship Age Fit0-9 years
Investment ScopeXL (> 3M USD)
Payback Time3-5 years
Ease of Executiondry dock
Pre-Planning Time8-12 months
Operations
Trim & Ballast Optimisation
Operations
Anchoring Efficiency
Operations
Energy Awareness Training
Operations
Weather Routing
Operations
Speed Optimisation
Operations
Performance Management
Hull & Propeller
Hull & Propeller Smoothness
Hull & Propeller
Energy Saving Devices
Hull & Propeller
Bulbous Bow Modification
Hull & Propeller
Propeller Exchange
Engine & Systems
Auxiliary Systems Optimisations
Engine & Systems
Engine Mod. for Slow Steaming
Engine & Systems
Engine De-Rating
Engine & Systems
LNG as Ship Fuel
Capacity Enhancement
Container Capacity Improvement
Capacity Enhancement
Route Specific Container Stowage
Capacity Enhancement
Draught Increase
Capacity Enhancement
Deckhouse Height Increase
Capacity Enhancement
Vessel Lengthening
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Ship Age Fit

For a ship within the displayed age range, the measure is likely to be attractive (aggregated for all ship types - values for individual ship types may differ)

Payback Time

Within the displayed time frame, the measure is likely to be above break-even (aggregated for all ship types - values for individual ship types may differ)

Investment Scope

XS:0-10k, S:10-150k, M:150-750k, L:750k-3M, XL>3M ; in US dollars dependent upon measure and selected fleet scope, large economies of scale might be applicable (Value given on a 'per ship' basis)

Applicability within Ship Type

Level of applicability for selected ship - the higher the value, the more likely that the measure fits well for all ships within ship type category

Sort order of results: by "Applicability within Ship Type" ; with no ship type selected, the sum of "Applicability within Ship Type" is applied

Stated values are estimates that may vary greatly dependingupon individual cirsumstances

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